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eye burfi

South Asian / Indian Art, Illustration, Graphic Design & Typography. Formerly at eyeburfi.tumblr.com. Twitter: @eyeburfi.

Posts tagged tibet:

19th-century Tibetan tiger rugs, from Giovanni Garcia-Fenech | Flickr

Via text-mode

Tibetan Musical Score. This Tibetan manuscript is a small musical score used for chanting rituals in Buddhist ceremonies. Curves, rather than scales, are used to record the correct recitation melodies, all orchestrated to the accompaniment of bells, cymbals, and other musical instruments. Scholars speculate that the Tibetan curved notation is one of the oldest forms of musical scoring in the world.  Image & Text: Library of Congress 

Tibetan Musical Score. This Tibetan manuscript is a small musical score used for chanting rituals in Buddhist ceremonies. Curves, rather than scales, are used to record the correct recitation melodies, all orchestrated to the accompaniment of bells, cymbals, and other musical instruments. Scholars speculate that the Tibetan curved notation is one of the oldest forms of musical scoring in the world.  Image & Text: Library of Congress 

Tibetan musical notation .Via ExperimentalType 

Tibetan musical notation .Via ExperimentalType 

Root of Diagnosis: This Tibetan medical thangka depicts the methods of diagnosis outlined in the Root Tantra. The trunks of the tree depict the three techniques of diagnosis: from left to right, visual observation, pulsology (reading the pulse), and inquiry. Visual observation breaks into two branches: examining samples of urine (top) and the condition of the patient’s tongue (bottom.) The next trunk, pulsology, is a subtle technique used to identify humoural imbalance by way of the pulse. The final trunk, inquiry, is divided into three separate branches, which illustrate the effects of each humour on diet and conduct. The leaves represent the body’s three humours. (Via Wikipedia)

Root of Diagnosis: This Tibetan medical thangka depicts the methods of diagnosis outlined in the Root Tantra. The trunks of the tree depict the three techniques of diagnosis: from left to right, visual observation, pulsology (reading the pulse), and inquiry. Visual observation breaks into two branches: examining samples of urine (top) and the condition of the patient’s tongue (bottom.) The next trunk, pulsology, is a subtle technique used to identify humoural imbalance by way of the pulse. The final trunk, inquiry, is divided into three separate branches, which illustrate the effects of each humour on diet and conduct. The leaves represent the body’s three humours. (Via Wikipedia)

Thangka of medicine and herbs. Via Exotic India

Thangka of medicine and herbs. Via Exotic India

Tibetan medicinal painting. Via Exotic India

Tibetan medicinal painting. Via Exotic India

The Origin of Poisons. Tibetan medicine painting via Exotic India

The Origin of Poisons. Tibetan medicine painting via Exotic India

Tibetan astrological diagram, via Exotic India

Tibetan astrological diagram, via Exotic India

Citipati: The Lords of the Cemetery. Tibetan thangka. Source: Exotic India

Citipati: The Lords of the Cemetery. Tibetan thangka. Source: Exotic India

heirloomrug:



Tibetan human pelt rug. Pretty insane, was recently exhibited at the Met.
This example depicts a bearded man, flayed (Tibetan: g.yang gzhi) and spread-eagle—a gruesome image testifying to the power of sacrifice in the pacification of malevolent spirits. The red patterning on the skin may suggest the internal organs or arteries. While such rugs were probably reserved for use by senior officiating lamas and as mats upon which to make tantric offerings, as recently as the nineteenth century, the use of actual human skins is recorded in descriptions of protector-deity worship. 

heirloomrug:

Tibetan human pelt rug. Pretty insane, was recently exhibited at the Met.

This example depicts a bearded man, flayed (Tibetan: g.yang gzhi) and spread-eagle—a gruesome image testifying to the power of sacrifice in the pacification of malevolent spirits. The red patterning on the skin may suggest the internal organs or arteries. While such rugs were probably reserved for use by senior officiating lamas and as mats upon which to make tantric offerings, as recently as the nineteenth century, the use of actual human skins is recorded in descriptions of protector-deity worship. 

Carpet of Flayed Man, c. 19th c. Tibet. Via Metropolitan Museum of Art
This flayed male (Tibetan: g.yang gzhi) appears to be bound at and suspended by the wrists. He is bearded and fanged and his skin is stripped, as if he were being identified with an animal, thus bridging the human and bestial worlds. His feet and hands intercept the decorative border of freshly severed heads, grinning macabrely. Such a fearsome carpet could have served as an appropriate site for making tantric offerings to the wrathful protector deities within the gonkhang, the chapel dedicated to their worship within a Tibetan monastery.

Carpet of Flayed Man, c. 19th c. Tibet. Via Metropolitan Museum of Art

This flayed male (Tibetan: g.yang gzhi) appears to be bound at and suspended by the wrists. He is bearded and fanged and his skin is stripped, as if he were being identified with an animal, thus bridging the human and bestial worlds. His feet and hands intercept the decorative border of freshly severed heads, grinning macabrely. Such a fearsome carpet could have served as an appropriate site for making tantric offerings to the wrathful protector deities within the gonkhang, the chapel dedicated to their worship within a Tibetan monastery.

raṃ in rañjanā script. (by Levente Bakos)

raṃ in rañjanā script. (by Levente Bakos)

Photograph of Buddha sculpture by Gonkar Gyatso, taken in the artist’s studio. Via Alegria

Photograph of Buddha sculpture by Gonkar Gyatso, taken in the artist’s studio. Via Alegria

'Mani Wood' by Tashi Mannox, 2009. Via http://inkessential.blogspot.com/

'Mani Wood' by Tashi Mannox, 2009. Via http://inkessential.blogspot.com/

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