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eye burfi

South Asian / Indian Art, Illustration, Graphic Design & Typography. Formerly at eyeburfi.tumblr.com. Twitter: @eyeburfi.

Posts tagged calligraphy:

Dedicatory inscription from a mosque. Carved gabbro stone, Indian Sultanate period (1206–1555), dated A.H. 905 / A.D.1500. India, Bengal.

Bengali inscriptions of the later Middle Ages often excel in the strong parallelism of the letters; the type of monumental thuluth script used in this instance has been called the “bow-and-arrow” style since the bow-shaped round letters are skillfully woven into the arrow-like straight shafts. The regularity achieved in combining the sixty verticals with the five “bows” is admirable. The stone represents a fine example of Bengali epigraphy from the time when the kingdom of Gaur was a center of literature, poetry, and the architectural arts.
Text & image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Dedicatory inscription from a mosque. Carved gabbro stoneIndian Sultanate period (1206–1555), dated A.H. 905 / A.D.1500. India, Bengal.

Bengali inscriptions of the later Middle Ages often excel in the strong parallelism of the letters; the type of monumental thuluth script used in this instance has been called the “bow-and-arrow” style since the bow-shaped round letters are skillfully woven into the arrow-like straight shafts. The regularity achieved in combining the sixty verticals with the five “bows” is admirable. The stone represents a fine example of Bengali epigraphy from the time when the kingdom of Gaur was a center of literature, poetry, and the architectural arts.

Text & image: Metropolitan Museum of Art

Chinese Muslim calligraphy in the Sinic (Chinese) Arabic script by Haji Noor Deen Mi Guang Jiang. From Han Kitab: Tracing Islam in China | Cima Mag

Chinese Muslim calligraphy in the Sinic (Chinese) Arabic script by Haji Noor Deen Mi Guang Jiang. From Han Kitab: Tracing Islam in China | Cima Mag

awais:

Rediscovering A1one after many years. Awestruck.

awais:

Rediscovering A1one after many years. Awestruck.

Banskhera Copperplate Inscription of Harshavardhana (c. 590-647) 
The ornate text at the bottom (in a precursor of the Devanagari script) incorporates King Harshavardhana’s signature. It reads: “My own hand. Sri Harsha, Lord Paramount.” (Svahasto mama maharajadhiraja sri Harshasya,) 
From Epigraphia Indica.  Via ibiblio.org

Banskhera Copperplate Inscription of Harshavardhana (c. 590-647) 

The ornate text at the bottom (in a precursor of the Devanagari script) incorporates King Harshavardhana’s signature. It reads: “My own hand. Sri Harsha, Lord Paramount.” (Svahasto mama maharajadhiraja sri Harshasya,)

From Epigraphia Indica.  Via ibiblio.org

Tibetan Musical Score. This Tibetan manuscript is a small musical score used for chanting rituals in Buddhist ceremonies. Curves, rather than scales, are used to record the correct recitation melodies, all orchestrated to the accompaniment of bells, cymbals, and other musical instruments. Scholars speculate that the Tibetan curved notation is one of the oldest forms of musical scoring in the world.  Image & Text: Library of Congress 

Tibetan Musical Score. This Tibetan manuscript is a small musical score used for chanting rituals in Buddhist ceremonies. Curves, rather than scales, are used to record the correct recitation melodies, all orchestrated to the accompaniment of bells, cymbals, and other musical instruments. Scholars speculate that the Tibetan curved notation is one of the oldest forms of musical scoring in the world.  Image & Text: Library of Congress 

Tibetan musical notation .Via ExperimentalType 

Tibetan musical notation .Via ExperimentalType 

from ” commandment ” | kashan rug  |  2011  |  Abolfazl Shahi  |   via homa art gallery

from ” commandment ” | kashan rug  |  2011  |  Abolfazl Shahi  |   via homa art gallery

from ” mist ” series | ink on canvas | 2011  |  azra aghighi bakhshayeshi | via homa art gallery

from ” mist ” series | ink on canvas | 2011  |  azra aghighi bakhshayeshi | via homa art gallery

Book Cover: Beast and Man in India: A Popular Sketch of Indian Animals in Their Relation With the People by John Lockwood Kipling, 1904. 
(via Vaguery)

Book Cover: Beast and Man in India: A Popular Sketch of Indian Animals in Their Relation With the People by John Lockwood Kipling, 1904. 

(via Vaguery)

Pegasus, the winged horse, from a Deccani manuscript of the astrological work Nujum al-‘Ulum (Stars of Sciences), copied from an earlier work (dated AD 1575) which was commissioned by Ali Adil Shah II of Bijapur. Via Wellcome Library

Pegasus, the winged horse, from a Deccani manuscript of the astrological work Nujum al-‘Ulum (Stars of Sciences), copied from an earlier work (dated AD 1575) which was commissioned by Ali Adil Shah II of Bijapur. Via Wellcome Library

Profile of Iranian street artist A1ONE (by Webistan Photo Agency)


Untitled (The Quatrains of Omar Khayyam) by Iranian calligrapher Nasrollah Afjei. Oil and ink on canvas, 2007

Untitled (The Quatrains of Omar Khayyam) by Iranian calligrapher Nasrollah Afjei. Oil and ink on canvas, 2007

Siyah mashq (lit. ‘black practice’ in Persian) originally referred to calligraphic practice sheets where words and letters were written facing in several directions and over each other, in order to conserve paper. However, when calligraphers realized how stunning some of these pieces were, siyah mashq evolved into a style of its own, where words and letters were repeated, regardless of meaning, in rhythmical compositions.
via islambook.net

Siyah mashq (lit. ‘black practice’ in Persian) originally referred to calligraphic practice sheets where words and letters were written facing in several directions and over each other, in order to conserve paper. However, when calligraphers realized how stunning some of these pieces were, siyah mashq evolved into a style of its own, where words and letters were repeated, regardless of meaning, in rhythmical compositions.

via islambook.net

Annemarie Schimmel on shikasta, from Calligraphy and Islamic Culture (1990).

Annemarie Schimmel on shikasta, from Calligraphy and Islamic Culture (1990).

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