eye burfi

Jul 17

An illustration from the Mahabharata Nepal, c. 1800 Depicting the five Pandava brothers dispatching and setting fire to their enemy within a striped tent, with scavengers, vultures and ghouls in the foreground, the relevant text written aboveOpaque pigments and gold on wasli
Source: The Sampradaya Sun

An illustration from the Mahabharata 
Nepal, c. 1800 
Depicting the five Pandava brothers dispatching and setting fire to their enemy within a striped tent, with scavengers, vultures and ghouls in the foreground, the relevant text written above
Opaque pigments and gold on wasli

Source: The Sampradaya Sun

Jul 09

A pair of wooden book covers possibly depicting the tantric forms of Ashta Matrika, or the Eight Mothers. Nepal, second half of the 17th century. Opaque pigments and gold on wood.
Source: Christie’s

A pair of wooden book covers possibly depicting the tantric forms of Ashta Matrika, or the Eight Mothers. Nepal, second half of the 17th century. Opaque pigments and gold on wood.

Source: Christie’s

Prajnaparamita Manuscript Page TibetCirca 13th- 14th century
 

Prajnaparamita Manuscript Page 
Tibet
Circa 13th- 14th century

 

Jul 02

Maitreya and Mañjuśrī, from a Satasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā manuscript, Dolpo, Nesar monastery. Source: Asianart.com

Maitreya and Mañjuśrī, from a Satasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā manuscript, Dolpo, Nesar monastery. Source: Asianart.com

Jun 23

Manuscript cover with scenes from Kalidasa’s play Shakuntala, 12th century, Nepal. 
Source: Met Museum

Manuscript cover with scenes from Kalidasa’s play Shakuntala, 12th century, Nepal.

Source: Met Museum

Jun 11

[video]

Jun 01


A Palace Complex with Harem Gardens. India, Lucknow or Faizabad, c. 1765. 
The miniature, whose primary motif is a fantastic palace complex populated by a prince’s concubines along with their female servants and guards, in a way depicts the world as one great garden. In the distance we see the prince on the back of an elephant, and on the other side of the river all manner of activities are taking place that form a powerful contrast to the perhaps pleasant but enforced idleness of the women of the harem.
The painting has been attributed to Faiz Allah, one of the many skilled artists who worked in the growing provincial courts at the time when the Mughals’ power was waning. He was familiar with the concept of European linear perspective, but he disregarded its laws, either deliberately or unintentionally.
Text & Image: The David Collection

A Palace Complex with Harem Gardens. India, Lucknow or Faizabad, c. 1765. 

The miniature, whose primary motif is a fantastic palace complex populated by a prince’s concubines along with their female servants and guards, in a way depicts the world as one great garden. In the distance we see the prince on the back of an elephant, and on the other side of the river all manner of activities are taking place that form a powerful contrast to the perhaps pleasant but enforced idleness of the women of the harem.

The painting has been attributed to Faiz Allah, one of the many skilled artists who worked in the growing provincial courts at the time when the Mughals’ power was waning. He was familiar with the concept of European linear perspective, but he disregarded its laws, either deliberately or unintentionally.

Text & Image: The David Collection

May 26




Women’s Dancing Party, a page from the Lady Coote Album, Lucknow style, ca. 1780.

Source: Fine Art Museums of San Francisco

Women’s Dancing Party, a page from the Lady Coote Album, Lucknow style, ca. 1780.

May 23

Miniature from a copy of the Ramayana. “Sita Shies Away from Hanuman, Believing He is Ravana in Disguise” India, Mughal; 1594
Known for his religious tolerance, the great Mughal Akbar had holy Hindu scriptures translated into Persian. He presented the magnificent copy of the Ramayana from which this miniature comes to his mother, Hamida Bano also known as ‘Maryam Makani’, in 1594. On the flyleaf is a note that the manuscript was viewed by Maryam Makani in August 1604, apparently when she was on her deathbed.
Text & Image: The David Collection | Persian Ramayanas (Rana Safvi / Tehelka)

Miniature from a copy of the Ramayana. “Sita Shies Away from Hanuman, Believing He is Ravana in Disguise” India, Mughal; 1594

Known for his religious tolerance, the great Mughal Akbar had holy Hindu scriptures translated into Persian. He presented the magnificent copy of the Ramayana from which this miniature comes to his mother, Hamida Bano also known as ‘Maryam Makani’, in 1594. On the flyleaf is a note that the manuscript was viewed by Maryam Makani in August 1604, apparently when she was on her deathbed.

Text & Image: The David Collection | Persian Ramayanas (Rana Safvi / Tehelka)

May 03

[video]

Rama slays Ravana. Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 2, folio 270; 
1597-1605, Fazl , (Indian, Mughal dynasty)
Via ShaK

Hanuman beheads Trisiras. Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 2, folio 228; 1597-1605, Shyam Sundar, (Indian, Mughal dynasty). Via ShaK

Hanuman beheads Trisiras. Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 2, folio 228; 1597-1605, Shyam Sundar, (Indian, Mughal dynasty). Via ShaK

Rama kills Maharaksha, from the Freer Ramayana. Via ShaK

Rama kills Maharaksha, from the Freer Ramayana. Via ShaK

Apr 29

Rama shatters the trident of the demon Viradha; Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 1, folio 117.
1597-1605, Shyam Sundar , (Indian, Mughal dynasty)
Via ShaK | Writes

Rama shatters the trident of the demon Viradha; Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 1, folio 117.
1597-1605, Shyam Sundar , (Indian, Mughal dynasty)
Via ShaK | Writes

Rama confers with the Vanara chieftains on Mt. Suvela.: Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 2, folio 194; recto: text; verso: 
1597-1605, Shyam Sundar (Indian. Mughal Dynasty) . Via wikipedia

Rama confers with the Vanara chieftains on Mt. Suvela.: Folio from the Ramayana of Valmiki (The Freer Ramayana), Vol. 2, folio 194; recto: text; verso: 

1597-1605, Shyam Sundar (Indian. Mughal Dynasty) . Via wikipedia